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Public domain books are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. Wald.—Historia Regis Waldei, by Johannes Bramis, edited by R. Not less terrible than dragons, but much more common, were trolls; and this fact led Brynjulfsson to remark that the introduc- tion of a troll in this connection was as characteristic as anything could be." The mtroduction of the troll is quite in harmony with the genius of Old Norse folk-lore. Truly he has changed much, but Hott alone didn't kill the beast, you were the man who did it.' Bothvar said, *It may be so.' The king said, *I knew as soon as you came here that only few men could compare with you, but this seems to me your most illustrious deed, that you have made a warrior out of Hott, who appeared little bom to great good fortune. As a result, there is great haste to get the chores done up early on Christmas Eve. It is not accidental that it b the king's sword that Hott uses and that it b the king him- self who makes the remark about it which he does.Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the publisher to a library and finally to you. The saga-man did not, however, characterize the dragon as a troll merely because he would thus be employing good saga-material, but because the depredations ascribed to the dragon in the Siward story, which were quite for- eign to the accounts of dragons in Scandinavian folk-lore, were very Hrolf said, 'This sword can only be borne by a man who is both brave and daring.' Hott answered, 'You shall be convinced that I am such a man.' The king said, *Who knows whether your character hasn't changed more than appearances show? ' Then Hott attacked the beast and struck at it as soon as he was near enough so that he could hit it, and the beast fell down dead. And now I wish him called Hott no longer, he shall from this day be named Hjalti,— thou shalt be called after the sword Gu Uinhjalti.'"— P. In fact, the fear that Hott shows before leav- ing the hall, when he knows he must go out, and the extreme fear that he shows later, can be duplicated from the tales that are told in connection with the superstition. The king, above all men, must be convinced of Hott's bravery, and in view of the manner in which Hott's bravery b dbplayed, the king must, indeed, be satisfied with the proof. Nor has the saga-man devised an artificial method of testing strength and coiurage. That a strength-giving drink enables one to wield a sword that an ordinary mortal cannot handle, is a motive em- ployed in a number of fairy tales.

"wulf." This, combined with other changes, which he discusses and illustrates, that might have taken place in the name in its passage from very early Danish to Anglo-Saxon, could have caused the Scandinavian name "Bp Svar" to be rend- ered "Beowulf" in Anglo-Saxon.* Sophus Bugge thou^t that saga-characteristics earlier ascribed to Beowulf had been transferred, in Danish tradition, to Bjarki. It was ^done as the king commanded; they made themselves ready for it. He agreed with Bugge, that B jarki's combat with the winged monster shows contact with the story of Beowulf's fight with the dragon.^ Sarrazin, repl3dng to ten Brink, scouts the idea that a poem, such as Becwulf, which was completely unknown in England after the eleventh century, should, after this time, be well known in Scan- dinavian coimtries and exert a notable influence there.^® G. In the West-Saxon line of kings, Beaw succeeded Scyld; in the poem Beowulf ^ Beowulf, the Danish king, succeeded Scyld; in Saxo's account, Frothi I suc- ceeded Scyld. Then they went in and were quiet; no one knew what they had done. Digitized by Google that in the Hrdlfssaga, which has too much the nature of a fairy tale to be ancient tradition. Bothvar said, 'Now you have become very strong, and I don't believe that you will be afraid of the troop of King Hrolf any longer.' Hott answered, 1 shall not fear them any more, nor shall I be afraid of you henceforth.' 'That is well, comrade Hott,' [said Bothvar] 'and now will we set up the beast, and arrange it so that the others will think it alive.' They did so.A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. But it should be observed how, in essence, the conception of the dragon in the Bjarki story harmonizes accurately with that in the Siward story. On the eve the shepherd went with his sheep",*" "In old da)rs no one could stay over Christmas Eve";" "It happened once late on a Yule Eve";** "Formerly every Christmas Eve";*' "I gamle dagc var det en julenat";** " Juleaften gik Per Bakken til kvemhuset";*' "Nogen av selskapet kom til at tale om Hammertro Uet, som det nu kaltes, og de mente, at skulde de nogengang vente ulempe av det arrige troll, saa maatte det vel vaere saadan i julegryet."*® Thus, as we see, the statement that the winged monster appears late Christmas Eve,** is exactly in harmony with the belief, still current in some parts of Norway, that on Christmas Eve, after sunset, but never ear Uer in the day, an adventure with a troll is to be expected unless proper precaution be taken to avoid it. His whole demeanor, from the moment he accedes to Bjarki's re- quest to attack the beast, reveals the change in his nature.Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. The king and his court are afflicted by the visitations of a dragon; and Bjarki puts an end to this affliction by killing the dragon, as Siward, in the corresponding situation, does by driving it away. It is a part of the superstition, that if any one ventures into, or near, the stable or other outbuildings late in the evening, he is in the greatest danger of being attacked by one of these malignant beings; and people are in mortal terror of falling into the clutches of a troll. But the proof of this change consbts, not in knocking over the dragon, but in bis ability to wield the sword i^ch the king himself says can "only be borne by a man who is both brave and daring." This must be conclusive proof to the king and to all present.

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This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. But to fit the dragon into the Bjarki story, it had to be killed in order that the blood-drinking episode might be introduced. Digitized by Google 25 suggestive of the depredations ascribed to trolls, and because a troll story would enable him to work out his plot with admirable effect. But so ingrained had this belief become in the boy that, when Christmas Eve arrived and he was requested to go to one of the outbuildings on an errand, he was seized with fright.